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Learn about nature and how to draw different animals in a fun and easy-to-follow step-by-step process. Dive into science and explore facts about endangered animals and species of greatest conservation need (SGCN) plus how to help them. Classes are currently being offered for grades 2-5 & 6-8 by request.

Nature Drawing raises awareness about our impact on the planet and fosters mindfulness, self-confidence, and self-esteem while teaching fun and easy art techniques. Students will also develop social communication and empathetic skills by participating in discussions about the challenges creatures face and by sharing their wonderful animal artwork.

Nature Drawing – Endangered Species: Books 1-2

Nature Drawing was born out of the pandemic and the need for virtual programming. It was such a success that we decided to keep doing it. The Endangered Species series features mammals, reptiles, and insects from around the globe. The virtual classroom is designed to feel like a clubhouse. There are jokes and, oftentimes, a show and tell of pets, schoolwork, and drawings done outside of class. Each session begins with mindful moments. After the class is relaxed, focused, and ready, we start the drawing instruction.

Using upcycled goods as templates, the students are visually led through step by step instruction by a student artist. They have the option to go at their own pace, following the workbook or following along with the artist teaching assistant. While the drawing is taking place, one of the TEF instructors talks about the subject’s habitat, food source, breeding habits, why this subject is endangered, and how they can help. The class concludes with a show and tell of everyone’s creation and a merry send off until the next workshop.

Each class is 60 minutes long, meeting weekly for seven weeks. Prior to the first class, students will be delivered a “Creativity Kit”. This will have all of the non-technology supplies that they will need for the class.

Nature Drawing – Rhode Island Animals: Books 3-5

Nature Drawing – Rhode Island Animals came about after we decided to team up with the Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management (RIDEM). Wendy Fachon, lead teacher, reached out to find the RI species in greatest conservation need (SGCN). In these classes, students will learn about RI animals, reptiles, and insects, their distinct ecosystems, and how to keep them and their habitats safe.

The virtual classroom is designed to feel like a clubhouse. Each session begins with mindful moments. After the class is relaxed, focused, and ready, we start the drawing instruction.

Using upcycled goods as templates, the students are visually led through step by step instruction by a RISD student artist. They have the option to go at their own pace, following the workbook or following along with the artist teaching assistant. While the drawing is taking place, one of the TEF instructors talks about the subject’s habitat, food source, breeding habits, why this subject is in need of conservation, and how they can help. The class concludes with a show and tell of everyone’s creation and a merry sendoff until the next workshop.

Each class is 60 minutes long, meeting weekly for seven weeks. Prior to the first class, students will be delivered a “Creativity Kit”. This will have all of the non-technology supplies that they will need for the class.

Endangered Species 1  Register Now on Enroll RI 
For grade 2-5 
July 8 – August 12, 2024 
Mondays – 3pm – 4pm

Endangered Species 2  Register Now on Enroll RI 
For grade 6-8 
July 8 – August 12, 2024 
Mondays – 5pm – 6pm

Rhode Island Animals: Ponds & Rivers  Register Now on Enroll RI 
For grade 2-5 
July 9 – August 13, 2024 
Tuesdays– 3pm – 4pm

Rhode Island Animals: Open Ocean  Register Now 
For grade 2-5 
July 9 – August 13, 2024 
Tuesdays– 5pm – 6pm

Rhode Island Animals: Salt Marsh  Register Now on Enroll RI 
For grade 2-5 
July 10 – August 14, 2024 
Wednesdays– 3pm – 4pm

Rhode Island Animals: Vernal Pool Register Now on Enroll RI 
For grade 2-5 
July 11 – August 15, 2024 
Thursdays– 3pm – 4pm

Rhode Island Animals: Open Ocean  Register Now 
For grade 2-5 
July 11 – August 15, 2024 
Thursdays – 5pm – 6pm 

LS2.A  Interdependent Relationship in Ecosystems

The food of almost any kind of animal can be traced back to plants. Organisms are related in food webs in which some animals eat plants for food and other animals eat the animals that eat plants. Organisms can survive only in environments in which their particular needs are met. A healthy ecosystem is one in which multiple species of different types are each able to meet their needs in a relatively stable web of life. Newly introduced species can damage the balance of an ecosystem.

5-ESS3-1 Earth and Human Activity

Obtain and combine information about ways individual communities use science ideas to protect the Earth’s resources and environment.

ESS3.C: Human Impacts on Earth Systems

Human activities in agriculture, industry, and everyday life have had major effects on the land, vegetation, streams, ocean, air, and even outer space. But individuals and communities are doing things to help protect Earth’s resources and environments.

3-LS3-2 Heredity: Inheritance and Variation of Traits

Use evidence (animal drawing) to support the explanation that traits can be influenced by the environment (draw animal in its environment).

4-LS1-1 From Molecules to Organisms: Structures and Processes

Construct an argument (drawing) that (demonstrates how) plants and animals have internal and external structures that function to support survival, growth, behavior, and reproduction.

NGSS Standards

The following NGSS standards are met by TEF’s Nature Drawing program.The Endangered Species series explore a variety of species and environments from around the world. The Vernal Pool and Ponds & Rivers series focus the diversity of animals in a given ecosystem (local to RI). Through the process of observation and drawing, the students learn about each species’s physical adaptations to the environment and its role in that ecosystem’s web of life.

Each individual lesson concludes with a discussion of human impact upon the environment as it relates to the species chances of survival. For example, water pollution affects the entire food chain. Students learn about actions being taken to help the species. For example, natural pesticide controls eliminate the use of toxic chemical substances. Student artwork is used to share the animal’s stories with others, raise awareness, and advocate for protective/preventive action and conservation.